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, foreign policy tends to either stain or illuminate a president's legacy. time will tell which foreign policy position will define the obama years. joining us to discuss from washington is former assistant secretary of state and professor at george washington university, professor pj crowley. professor, thank you for joining us. >> hello. >> pj as we talk about the legacy of the obama doctrine, vis-a-vis our war on terrorists drones. the attacks were motivated to do what they did by the wars in iraq and afghanistan. i'll quote a little bit from that story. the 19-year-old suspect in the boston marathon bombings has told interrogators that the american wars in iraq and afghanistan, motivated he and his brother to carry out the attack. what do you make of that, pj? >> i'm not surprised at all that has been a motivator for jihadists around the world, particularly the u.s. invasion of iraq in 2003. so this just continues a theme, and it's not even unique to the united states. faisal shazad, the times square bomber, said he was motivated by the ongoing drone campaign in pakistan. >> wes, as
as normal and sweet. >>brian: is there a chance they were normal men and did our foreign policy play into this? a foreign c.i.a. operative, head of the osama bin laden unit, what went into the mind set of these two that you can ascertain from what you know? >> i think we're going to find because of the internet age, because of the rapidity of communications, the grievances of the arab world against the united states in terms of our foreign policy, whether it's being on the arab peninsula, supporting the saudi tyranny, supporting the israelis is now a common thread across the muslim world. as long as that foreign policy stays in place, we need to realize that we're cultivating enemies. this is going to continue both at home and abroad for a very long time. >>john: we should expect more of these kinds of attacks? >> without a doubt, sir. this is no reason to believe our domestic population of young male muslims is going to be immune from the propaganda of al qaeda and other groups that has worked everywhere in the world. this is just a problem that america needs to face. we don't neces
something against the american government. they had a heated argument about u.s. foreign policy. nice to see you, sir. >> hey, nice to see you. >> tell me, how did you first meet the two brothers? was it just living in the same building in is that how you knew them? >> i met the older brother two weeks prior into moving into the apartment under them. i met him at a pizza is shop across from my high school. >> what was tamerlan like? >> my first interaction with him was he was sitting at a table at a pizza shop across my high school and he was talking to another kid that used to go to cambridge latin high school. i overheard the conversation and he was basically explaining the koran to the person he was sitting with and the differences between the bible and the koran. i noticed in a way he was idolizing the koran and trash talking the bible. i was very interested in the topic and i didn't know much about religion, whether it's christianity or islam, and he seemed like he was very well-educated about both so i wanted to join the argument or the discussion. so, yeah, i basically joined the disc
, in regard to our foreign policy in terms of what we're doing in the muslim world. so their motivation is becoming very similar to the motivation in other parts of the muslim world. >> that's something we really do need to take a closer look at because it really brings the world here. it brings chechnya here to the u.s. by looking at it through social media and the internet. thank you so much for joining us michael scheuer. >> thank you. >>> the time is 25 after the top of the hour. coming up, we'll return to boston where the younger suspect is in the hospital. investigators are waiting to talk with him. >>> plus, the lockdown is over in boston. but our terrorism analyst says that the brothers did not work alone. great first gig! let's go! party! awwwww... arigato! we are outta here! party...... finding you the perfect place, every step of the way. hotels.com because every flake is double-toasted... splashed with sweet honey... and covered in rich double-roasted peanuts. mmm. [ hero ] yummy. [ male announcer ] kellogg's crunchy nut. it's super delicious! [ male announcer ] just when yo
.o. toward national security and foreign policy which is to say to lighten the american footprint in the reasoning, but to deal with these threats of so that's one point. the other thing is, i don't think that barack obama considers the drones a panacea in the war on terror. and one of his top national security advisers said to me, he sees it as an important tactical weapon that has strategic implications. but mostly, he sees it as an opportunity to try to prevent the next attack in the united states. so he was pretty hard nosed about that. so that's where he is. >> richard, you know, i can make moral and legal arguments for codifying our drone program. the rules of engagement and i have in the past. there is also a very practical argument for getting this down on paper. and increasing the transparency on it. when, not if, when bad actors get their hands on the same technology that we have, and use it in terrible ways, we really lose our ability to lean on our allies and world bodies and ask them to sanction or punish these bad actors for an unaccountable drone program when the ma
of charges that becomes a big foreign policy problem. that's one of the reasons why the state department was so opposed to the waterboarding under colin powell. >> exactly. to have it labeled -- so then you get into the territory of were crimes committed? and what kind of future implications there are for that. >> briefly, before i let you go. we do want to talk about it in more detail, the book. the appreciate now to move the program from the cia back to where many say it afc belonged in the military where there could be more oversight. what you've uncovered is the extent of secret relationships with pakistan, things that have never been reported, never been revealed, i guess, to other than the intel gens community? >> i think when you look at the history of the secret war since 9/11, there's so much that's gone on in the shadows that we have not known about and not certainly told to the public or told to congress. as you said, pressure is building to become more transparent. president obama set in the state of the union there would be more transparency, and we'll see what happens. >> t
u.s. foreign policy. and as that rises, hostility rises, rage rises and people want to reach out against the united states. so this radicalization is an issue that the u.s. government has been focused on for many, many years certainly since before 9/11 but certainly since 9/11. >> i read an interesting article, i think it was in the national review, but i have to go back and check that about the fact that we know longer sort of patriotize those who come, legal immigrants who come here. and looks at europe and says part of what happened in britain was that there were just these separate communities, no sense of common community. and it seems to me that these -- at least the older brother represented that sense of alienation. >> possibly. one of the things that we found is people that have a strong core and very strong values regarding anything can't be brainwashed into going against their values. >> right. >> he was looking for something. and let's say that he was radicalized in chechnya, in russia. he was already of the mindset to -- well, he would have been a sitting duck had he
think about in modern history any time there's been an attack by an immigrant or foreign born national in this country, it directly affected immigration policy. in 1993, the bombing led to the 1996 immigration overhaul which kicked a lot of immigrants off welfare and tightened up a lot of things there. after 9/11 there was a lot of different culture about immigration changing entirely. we had books defendi ining internme internment. even tknow there's no connectio, it will affect things. >> let's play sound from senator dick durbin. a member of the gang of eight. >> the worst thing we can do is nothing. if we do nothing leaving 11 million people in the shadows not making borders safer, not having information that comes from employment and these visa holders, we will be less safe in america. immigration reform will make us safer. >> victoria, what's your take on this? what's this going to mean for immigration reform? >> it absolutely will make us safer. we'll see millions more dollars going into border enforcement. one of the key provisions is we'll have an effective visa entry and exit
is defined, i don't think it's just who the individual is, if they are a foreign national -- >> or a group of individuals. >> -- or a group of individuals, it's the way which that person then initially directly connects to our policy. >> do you think that's right with respect to law enforcement, do you think the division between the timothy mcveigh's of the world and muhammads of the world? >> i think that it doesn't really. i mean, i believe -- this is from my experience, you cannot and should not get tunnel vision looking for a specific, you know, because somebody has a particular faith, they pray five times a day, therefore, it's an international terrorism versus a timothy mcveigh type. we have seen so many cases where you have -- >> let me just say, it could be a left wing terrorist, we literally know nothing. someone who is mad at his or her ex-spouse who happened to be working the medic tent. >> what you need to focus on is the activity, the race, religion, you know, all of that really is irrelevant when it comes to you have to be able to prove the activity isn't furtherance of terro
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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